Chicago Province Archive

History

In 1673, Jesuit Father Jacques Marquette, Louis Jolliet, and five voyageurs  left the New France mission of St. Ignace to explore the Mississippi River. When Marquette and his fellow explorers began their return journey north, they learned from the local Native Americans that the Illinois River provided a shorter route back to the Great Lakes. By that route they reached Lake Michigan near the site of what would become the city of Chicago. After making a report of his findings to his superiors, Marquette and his companions returned to the Illinois territory late in 1674, becoming the first Europeans to winter in Chicago.

The area that would encompass the Chicago Province was originally administrated by the Jesuits from Missouri. The Missouri Province quickly expanded into Cincinnati, Ohio where they opened St. Xavier’s College. The success of the Society in Cincinnati, led to its expansion into Chicago. In 1857, Arnold Damen was sent to look over possible sites for a dioceses, and three years later Holy Family Church was dedicated.  In the fall of 1870 St. Ignatius College, later Loyola University, opened its doors with Damen as its first president.

Due to the growth of the society, the Chicago Province  separated from Missouri in 1928. Members of the Chicago Province served in several missions overseas, including India, Nepal, and Peru.

In 1955, the Chicago Province was a divided into the Chicago and Detroit Provinces. Reconfiguration of the American provinces led to the rejoining of the Chicago and Detroit Provinces in January 2011.


Collection Summary

The Chicago Province Archive was transferred to the Midwest Jesuit Archives in 1996.


Collection Arrangement

The Chicago Province Archive is arranged in three record groups:

RG 1: Government of the Province

RG 2: Personnel in the Province

RG 3:  Locations of Ministries in the Province


Finding Guides for the Chicago Province Collections

CHI.2.001 Francis X. Weninger papers